Tag Archives: SQL

SQL queries in powershell

I was trying to query the SCCM database and sort the results with Powershell to get a full report on all the connections to a collection. To do this i needed to inject a SELECT query and retrieve an object from the database which proved to be a bit difficult. Below is how i resolved it.

To connect to a SQL you need a client, in powershell and .NET we have the System.Data.SQLClient namespace

$connection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection

Then i needed a connection string to open the database.

$connection.ConnectionString = "$ConnectionString"
$connection.Open()

Now we need to inject the command we want. Fairly simple, we create a SQLCommand and connect it to the already established connection.

$Command = New-Object System.Data.SQLClient.SQLCommand
$Command.Connection = $Connection

Then we insert our command

$Command.CommandText = $SQLQuery

What we do after is execute the command and create a counter of the columns in the result.

$Reader = $Command.ExecuteReader()
$Counter = $Reader.FieldCount

Now we create the DataTable and use the counter to populate the columns. We name them after each column in the query.

$DataTable = New-Object system.Data.DataTable
for($i = 0; $i -lt $counter; $i++){
    $Column = New-Object system.Data.DataColumn $Reader.GetName($i),([string])
    $DataTable.Columns.Add($Column)
}

While the Reader is active it processes a loop for the length of counter and ejects the results into new rows in the DataTable.
To get the correct formatting, we place everything into a string and format accordingly. Name and value.
We then use the Invoke-Expression cmdlet to execute the formatted string and add values to the rows

while ($Reader.Read()) {
    $Data = @()
    for ($i = 0; $i -lt $Counter; $i++) {
        $Data += [String]$Reader.GetValue($i)
    }
    $DataTable.Rows.Add($Data)
}

Last but not least, we close the reader and the connection to the database and output the finished table

$Reader.Close()
$Connection.Close()
   
Return $DataTable

And we’re done!

The finished function will now look like this:

Function Get-SQLQuery{
    Param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [String]$SQLQuery,
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [String]$ConnectionString
    )
    $connection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
    $connection.ConnectionString = "$ConnectionString"
    $connection.Open()
    $Command = New-Object System.Data.SQLClient.SQLCommand
    $Command.Connection = $Connection
    $Command.CommandText = $SQLQuery
    $Reader = $Command.ExecuteReader()
    $Counter = $Reader.FieldCount
    
    $DataTable = New-Object system.Data.DataTable
    for($i = 0; $i -lt $counter; $i++){
        $Column = New-Object system.Data.DataColumn $Reader.GetName($i),([string])
        $DataTable.Columns.Add($Column)
    }
    
    while ($Reader.Read()) {
        $Data = @()
        for ($i = 0; $i -lt $Counter; $i++) {
            $Data += [String]$Reader.GetValue($i)
        }
        $DataTable.Rows.Add($Data)
    }
    $Reader.Close()
    $Connection.Close()
    
    Return $DataTable
}

First set your connectionstring and Select query then invoke the command like this:

Get-SQLQuery -ConnectionString $connectionstring -SQLQuery $SelectQuery

Examples of connectionstrings can be found at Connectionstrings.com
The usual string is the trusted which uses your credentials

If you are using the function a lot, concider adding it to your Powershell profile. For more information check out my previous post on WGET and profiles